This cheerful discussion of the changes puberty brings combines friendly, conversational advice from the author with signed...

THE CARE AND KEEPING OF YOU

THE BODY BOOK FOR YOUNGER GIRLS, REV. ED.

Head-to-toe advice for preteen girls.

This cheerful discussion of the changes puberty brings combines friendly, conversational advice from the author with signed comments and questions, perhaps from preteens. Opening with general “Body Basics,” the text is organized by body part much like an exercise program. There are chapters on heads, breasts, bellies, the pubic area and legs. Within chapters, each spread covers a different topic. Braces, bra choice, acne, sports safety and sleep troubles are just a few examples. In some areas, the advice is quite specific: There are illustrated how-to instructions for shaving legs and using a menstrual pad. The girls shown represent considerable diversity in skin tones, hair and clothing. Lively design adds to the appeal of this growing-up guide, a revision of a popular title first published in 1998. The new illustrations are similar but feature darker skin shades, a greater range of pubescent girls and slightly more modern clothing. There are sporadic changes in the text that reflect new approaches to the use of sunscreen and new nutrition and sleep guidelines. Instructions for tampon insertion and definitions of eating disorders have been moved to the companion book for older girls, The Care and Keeping of You 2 (2012).

Pub Date: Feb. 26, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-60958-083-4

Page Count: 102

Publisher: American Girl

Review Posted Online: April 1, 2014

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A hodgepodge of self-help advice that loses its steam with its lack of focus and unfamiliarity with Gen Z icons.

BRAVER, STRONGER, SMARTER

A FUN AND EASY GUIDE TO BEING MORE MINDFUL, MORE CONFIDENT, AND MORE YOU!

Braver, stronger, smarter?

This mix-up of intention and execution begins as the author vents about the many crafted narratives that accompany preternaturally happy-looking selfies on social media and their potential impact on one’s confidence—aka, everyone’s happy, and I’m not. The initial pitch encourages readers to acknowledge their own confidence by disconnecting from social media and utilizing more time for creativity. Amid puzzles, exhortations, and exercises such as creating your own song, crafting a haiku, or trying sudoku, the author contradicts the original message of avoiding social media by encouraging readers to create their own apps, which most likely would tempt them to venture back online. Another stumble is the haphazard selection of celebrity quotes that are peppered throughout the book, including from Richard Branson and Lady Gaga, two people the lower edge of the publisher’s targeted “8 & up” audience would probably be unfamiliar with, along with Miley Cyrus, and Zac Efron, two former Disney Channel stars who date back 15 years. The book is designed to be written and doodled in, marking it for personal use rather than lending.

A hodgepodge of self-help advice that loses its steam with its lack of focus and unfamiliarity with Gen Z icons. (puzzle answers, quote sources) (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: July 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-7282-0953-1

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Sourcebooks eXplore

Review Posted Online: April 8, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2020

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Adults may have to force-feed this purposive book to those not yet committed to the important causes outlined here.

WHAT'S FOR LUNCH?

HOW SCHOOLCHILDREN EAT AROUND THE WORLD

"Organic," "sustainable" and "food miles" all appear in the comprehensive glossary of this book, whose simple title and cover photograph imply a basic approach to the international topic of food.

This very political book, biased toward food equity, explains why certain foods are eaten in certain countries and why school lunches are important. They fill various needs, from the teaching of courtesy and table manners in France and Japan to the supply of basic nutrients for Somali children in refugee-camp schools. Efforts to improve children’s eating habits, curb obesity, encourage use of local crops and provide food to students with limited economic resources are discussed. As the book is from Canada, naturally there are some references to that country in many of the comparisons. Though published in a seemingly picture-book format, the text is complex. Most two-page spreads describe school lunchtime in an individual country, with a cartoonish illustration on the left and a large photograph of a typical meal on the right with numbered arrows pointing to particular elements. Lengthy captions are keyed to each number. Small globe images in each spread point out countries, but larger maps and a bibliography would be useful. “The Message to Parents, Teachers and Students” provides project ideas.

Adults may have to force-feed this purposive book to those not yet committed to the important causes outlined here. (Nonfiction. 9-12)

Pub Date: Oct. 15, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-88995-482-3

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Red Deer Press

Review Posted Online: Sept. 15, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2012

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