This easy-to-follow-along tale with its happy-family ending will make for a great bedtime story.

LOST AND FOUND DUCKLINGS

When Brother Duck and Sister Duck receive a gift of butterfly nets, the siblings go against Mama and Papa Duck’s wishes and wander off into the woods, lost in the chase to catch any small critter that crosses their path.

When nightfall suddenly catches the ducklings in the middle of the forest and the reality of being lost hits the ducklings, their cries are heard by Ms. Owl, who gathers the forest animals to call out for Mama and Papa Duck. The illustrations depict a comical, lively character ensemble of distinct personalities. One after another, each animal howls out their unique distress call: Ms. Wolf’s “piercing howl,” Mr. Moose’s “earthshaking bellow,” Ms. Fox’s “shrill scream,” and Mr. Bear’s “fierce growl.” Eventually, it is the combination of simultaneous animal screeching that leads the Duck parents to their lost ducklings, who send up their own peeps into the night. At the end, the Duck parents deny hearing all of the other animals that helped the ducklings, confessing to only hearing their ducklings’ “sweet peep-peep-peep” amid the noise. Gorbachev’s friendly cartoons depict clothed, anthropomorphic forest animals, the ducklings’ urgent body language instantly recognizable. The animals’ vocalizations will make for rousing read-alouds.

This easy-to-follow-along tale with its happy-family ending will make for a great bedtime story. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Feb. 12, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-8234-4107-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: Oct. 15, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2018

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As ephemeral as a valentine.

LOVE FROM THE CRAYONS

Daywalt and Jeffers’ wandering crayons explore love.

Each double-page spread offers readers a vision of one of the anthropomorphic crayons on the left along with the statement “Love is [color].” The word love is represented by a small heart in the appropriate color. Opposite, childlike crayon drawings explain how that color represents love. So, readers learn, “love is green. / Because love is helpful.” The accompanying crayon drawing depicts two alligators, one holding a recycling bin and the other tossing a plastic cup into it, offering readers two ways of understanding green. Some statements are thought-provoking: “Love is white. / Because sometimes love is hard to see,” reaches beyond the immediate image of a cat’s yellow eyes, pink nose, and black mouth and whiskers, its white face and body indistinguishable from the paper it’s drawn on, to prompt real questions. “Love is brown. / Because sometimes love stinks,” on the other hand, depicted by a brown bear standing next to a brown, squiggly turd, may provoke giggles but is fundamentally a cheap laugh. Some of the color assignments have a distinctly arbitrary feel: Why is purple associated with the imagination and pink with silliness? Fans of The Day the Crayons Quit (2013) hoping for more clever, metaliterary fun will be disappointed by this rather syrupy read.

As ephemeral as a valentine. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Dec. 24, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5247-9268-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Penguin Workshop

Review Posted Online: Feb. 2, 2021

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A sweet, tender and charming experience to read aloud or together.

HEY, DUCK!

A clueless duckling tries to make a new friend.

He is confused by this peculiar-looking duck, who has a long tail, doesn’t waddle and likes to be alone. No matter how explicitly the creature denies he is a duck and announces that he is a cat, the duckling refuses to acknowledge the facts.  When this creature expresses complete lack of interest in playing puddle stomp, the little ducking goes off and plays on his own. But the cat is not without remorse for rejecting an offered friendship. Of course it all ends happily, with the two new friends enjoying each other’s company. Bramsen employs brief sentences and the simplest of rhymes to tell this slight tale. The two heroes are meticulously drawn with endearing, expressive faces and body language, and their feathers and fur appear textured and touchable. Even the detailed tree bark and grass seem three-dimensional. There are single- and double-page spreads, panels surrounded by white space and circular and oval frames, all in a variety of eye-pleasing juxtapositions. While the initial appeal is solidly visual, young readers will get the gentle message that friendship is not something to take for granted but is to be embraced with open arms—or paws and webbed feet.

A sweet, tender and charming experience to read aloud or together. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Jan. 22, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-375-86990-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Nov. 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2012

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