This surefire hit with construction fans happily bestows some much-needed sympathy on those caregivers wrangling with little...

THREE GRUMPY TRUCKS

Heck hath no fury like a toy whose playtime has been interrupted.

Tarpley offers up another misbehaving toy trio with a kid thrust into the role of parent (Beep! Beep! Go to Sleep!, 2015). On a sunny day, a hard hat–clad child scooters to the playground, taking three toy trucks along. The trucks thoroughly enjoy whirring, grinding, chomping, and more. Three times their child guardian tells them they must leave, and two times they whine to stay longer—pitching an all-out hissy fit the third. Soothed in her arms (in a surprise twist, the child’s construction helmet is removed to reveal a ponytail and the narrative introduces the feminine pronoun), they calm down and are brought home to dream of digging adventures to come. Tarpley keeps the short and rhyming text perky with blessedly perfect scansion. And thanks to the positioning of child as parental figure, kids may find themselves sympathizing with both the temper-tantrum–ers and the temper-tantrum–ee. Pleasant, cartoonish art rendered in watercolors, pastels, and colored pencils give the book a mild jolt of pep.

This surefire hit with construction fans happily bestows some much-needed sympathy on those caregivers wrangling with little “trucks” of their own. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Sept. 4, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-316-34122-6

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2018

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A sweet, tender and charming experience to read aloud or together.

HEY, DUCK!

A clueless duckling tries to make a new friend.

He is confused by this peculiar-looking duck, who has a long tail, doesn’t waddle and likes to be alone. No matter how explicitly the creature denies he is a duck and announces that he is a cat, the duckling refuses to acknowledge the facts.  When this creature expresses complete lack of interest in playing puddle stomp, the little ducking goes off and plays on his own. But the cat is not without remorse for rejecting an offered friendship. Of course it all ends happily, with the two new friends enjoying each other’s company. Bramsen employs brief sentences and the simplest of rhymes to tell this slight tale. The two heroes are meticulously drawn with endearing, expressive faces and body language, and their feathers and fur appear textured and touchable. Even the detailed tree bark and grass seem three-dimensional. There are single- and double-page spreads, panels surrounded by white space and circular and oval frames, all in a variety of eye-pleasing juxtapositions. While the initial appeal is solidly visual, young readers will get the gentle message that friendship is not something to take for granted but is to be embraced with open arms—or paws and webbed feet.

A sweet, tender and charming experience to read aloud or together. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Jan. 22, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-375-86990-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Nov. 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2012

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Still, this young boy’s imagination is a powerful force for helping him deal with life, something that should be true for...

OLIVER AND HIS EGG

Oliver, of first-day-of-school alligator fame, is back, imagining adventures and still struggling to find balance between introversion and extroversion.

“When Oliver found his egg…” on the playground, mint-green backgrounds signifying Oliver’s flight into fancy slowly grow larger until they take up entire spreads; Oliver’s creature, white and dinosaurlike with orange polka dots, grows larger with them. Their adventures include sharing treats, sailing the seas and going into outer space. A classmate’s yell brings him back to reality, where readers see him sitting on top of a rock. Even considering Schmid’s scribbly style, readers can almost see the wheels turning in his head as he ponders the girl and whether or not to give up his solitary play. “But when Oliver found his rock… // Oliver imagined many adventures // with all his friends!” This last is on a double gatefold that opens to show the children enjoying the creature’s slippery curves. A final wordless spread depicts all the children sitting on rocks, expressions gleeful, wondering, waiting, hopeful. The illustrations, done in pastel pencil and digital color, again make masterful use of white space and page turns, although this tale is not nearly as funny or tongue-in-cheek as Oliver and His Alligator (2013), nor is its message as clear and immediately accessible to children.

Still, this young boy’s imagination is a powerful force for helping him deal with life, something that should be true for all children but sadly isn’t. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: July 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-4231-7573-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2014

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