HOW ABOUT A KISS FOR ME?

Readers join a little boy as he puckers up for some pretty unusual kisses. Dogs, frogs, cats, bats and all manner of farmyard animals are all recipients of this curious toddler’s smooches. “Do you like to kiss a bunny? / Kiss a bunny? That is funny.” From these rather harmless animals, he then goes on to consider toes, cacti, worms, mops and skunks. But at the end of the day, the most enthusiastic recipient of his kisses is his dad, who hugs and kisses him before tucking him in: “There’s nothing I would rather do / Than be someone who’s kissed by you.” Tarpley’s rolling verse reads aloud easily, and the text/illustration juxtapositions lend well to predictive reading. The absurdity of some of the kissing combinations will appeal to little ones. Woodruff’s sweet watercolors depict an overall-clad toddler with muddy cheeks and an adorable smile. Pucker up—this one’s sure to elicit kisses with every reading. (Picture book. 1-3)

Pub Date: June 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-525-42235-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Dutton

Review Posted Online: June 3, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2010

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Sweet—but more for adults than children.

ALL THE LOVE IN THE WORLD

A doting pair of adult bears follows a baby bear through a busy day.

These fully engaged caregivers are clearly awed by the little cub, starting with “You’re the morning sunshine” and ending with “you sleep so peacefully / beneath the twinkling stars.” In between, the baby bear paints a picture, sings with one adult, tickles with the other, drinks cocoa, takes a walk and flies a kite, rides a bike, and is playfully swung in the air before a bath. Much of the action is communicated only by the pictures. The tender rhyming verses focus on the wonder of familial love. Every other stanza ends with the refrain: “This world of ours is full of love / when you are here with me.” Curiously, although this cub has two present, caregiving adults, the narrative, presumably addressed to the child, uses the first-person singular. The baby bear is presented as gender-neutral, first in orange-and-green polka-dot pajamas and then in blue jeans with a white shirt graced with yellow ducks. Although neither adult bear is gendered in the text, the illustrations use stereotypical cues: One wears a yellow dress decorated with hearts; the other wears a striped shirt (and no trousers). No one can miss that the baby bear is the adults’ little darling.

Sweet—but more for adults than children. (Board book. 1-3)

Pub Date: Dec. 24, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-68010-603-9

Page Count: 22

Publisher: Tiger Tales

Review Posted Online: Dec. 18, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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Good for a holiday snuggle with a little one.

I LOVE YOU THROUGH AND THROUGH AT CHRISTMAS, TOO!

Loving assurance comes wrapped in holiday sentiments.

Church’s round-faced toddler will be instantly recognizable from previous titles thanks to the tiny eyes and toothless smile. Whether inside or out, both the child and a teddy-bear companion sport bright red Santa hats. The gentle, first-person text assures this winsome toddler of the narrator’s unconditional love while the text evokes both the frenetic activity of Christmas preparations and the ideals of the season. “[S]hopping and wrapping / making and baking” are balanced by “I love you because you are patient and kind, // merry and bright, // helping and giving.” Sometimes the text rhymes (“I love you with bells and wreaths, // garland and trees”), but instead of forcing consistent rhymes, Rossetti-Shustak relies on rhythm and pacing to deliver her message. Muted greens, russet reds, and tawny backgrounds scattered with stars and snowflakes give the illustrations an old-fashioned feel. The sturdy binding and padded covers will survive rough handling. There’s not a real story here; just an attitude of unmitigated acceptance. The child has light skin and a few wisps of brown hair.

Good for a holiday snuggle with a little one. (Board book. 1-3)

Pub Date: Sept. 25, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-338-23010-9

Page Count: 26

Publisher: Cartwheel/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Oct. 16, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2019

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