Time flies when you’re having fun reading this terrifically silly spoof.

TIME FLIES

DOWN TO THE LAST MINUTE

From the Private I series , Vol. 3

Private investigator I returns to solve a case of lost time in this new installment of Lazar's Private I series.

“After dozing in my chair, I had some time on my hands,” begins the bright pink anthropomorphic capital letter I, depicted in a simple serif font and sporting a fedora hat and tie. Opting to take a stroll in the not-mean-looking streets of Capital City, he soon discovers that there is something amiss—a thief is absconding with the city’s clocks and timepieces. Private I interviews victims, including the letter G, who humorously goes by the name Grandfather and owns a store called Grandfather’s Clocks.Then the solution dawns on I. He calls for a noontime town meeting in Punctuation Park (“You'll know it's noon when the sun's directly overhead,” I advises), and when a certain letter shows up early, intent on sabotaging the park’s sundial, readers discover that there’s more to the time-averse thief than meets the eye. Wordplay and visual quips abound in this clever and uncontrived sendup of the detective noir drama. Dramatic irony is humorously supplied by the fact that the illustrations hint at the culprit’s identity from the very first pages. Both the puns and the whodunit will help kids build critical thinking and literacy skills. The cartoonish artwork, rendered in watercolor and colored pencil with letterpress details, have a retro sensibility.

Time flies when you’re having fun reading this terrifically silly spoof. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: April 26, 2022

ISBN: 978-0-7595-5492-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: Dec. 27, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2022

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Between its autumn and field-trip themes and the fact that not many books start countdowns from 20, this may find its way to...

PUMPKIN COUNTDOWN

A class visits the pumpkin patch, giving readers a chance to count down from 20.

At the farm, Farmer Mixenmatch gives them the tour, which includes a petting zoo, an educational area, a corn maze and a tractor ride to the pumpkin patch. Holub’s text cleverly though not always successfully rhymes each child’s name within the line: “ ‘Eighteen kids get on our bus,’ says Russ. / ‘But someone’s late,’ says Kate. / ‘Wait for me!’ calls Kiri.” Pumpkins at the tops of pages contain the numerals that match the text, allowing readers to pair them with the orange-colored, spelled-out numbers. Some of the objects proffered to count are a bit of a stretch—“Guess sixteen things we’ll see,” count 14 cars that arrived at the farm before the bus—but Smith’s artwork keeps things easy to count, except for a challenging page that asks readers to search for 17 orange items (answers are at the bottom, upside down). Strangely, Holub includes one page with nothing to count—a sign marks “15 Pumpkin Street.” Charming, multicultural round-faced characters and lots of detail encourage readers to go back through the book scouring pages for the 16 things the kids guessed they might see. Endpapers featuring a smattering of pumpkin facts round out the text.

Between its autumn and field-trip themes and the fact that not many books start countdowns from 20, this may find its way to many library shelves. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: July 1, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-8075-6660-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Whitman

Review Posted Online: May 16, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2012

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A mind-stretching outlook that may help youngsters with change—and will certainly cause them to think.

THE END IS JUST THE BEGINNING

A cyclical take on life.

Endings can sometimes feel sad or heavy in their finality. But Bender reverses this perspective. In fact, the story starts, as a tiny caterpillar tells readers, with “THE END.” A young tot on a bed closing a book looks puzzled. Bender acknowledges the absurdity. “But wait—how can a book possibly start with the end? That’s ridiculous.” It’s not, once you change your frame of reference. Continuing in a conversational tone, Bender gives examples. Some are personal and immediate: “The end of a disagreement with someone … / is just the beginning of making up.” Others are more abstract: “When you count, the end of one number is just the beginning of the next number… / and so on and so on and so on, all the way to infinity, which, by the way, NEVER ends!” Two friends or perhaps siblings (one with brown skin and brown hair in two Afro puffs, the other with pale skin and straight, black hair) act out the scenarios, which are strung together over the course of a day from one morning to the next. Mayo’s illustrations also dance between concrete and abstract, illustrating disagreement with one kid scowling, sitting back to the other, who looks distressed, next to a ruined sand castle and infinity with an image of the two kids cycling along an enormous infinity sign. In a meta-infused closing, Bender concludes with “THE BEGINNING / (of discovering the next book).” A cleverly placed butterfly flits away. The hazy wash over muted tones gives a warm, cozy embrace to the message. (This book was reviewed digitally with 9-by-18-inch double-page spreads viewed at 48.2% of actual size.)

A mind-stretching outlook that may help youngsters with change—and will certainly cause them to think. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: April 20, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-984896-93-3

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: March 2, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2021

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more