An affirmative, delightfully diverse overview of disabilities.

JUST ASK!

BE DIFFERENT, BE BRAVE, BE YOU

Drawing on her experiences as a child with juvenile diabetes, the Supreme Court justice addresses kids’ curiosity about disability and illness.

“Each of us grows in our own way,” says Sonia, a Latina child based on the author, as she and her friends plant a garden. Just as each plant has a “different color, different shape, and different purpose,” kids are “all different too.” Encouraging curious readers to “JUST ASK,” Sonia and 11 friends introduce their respective disabilities and chronic illnesses—ranging from blindness to nut allergies—by asking such questions as “How do you use your senses?” and “Are you really good at something?” The kids’ matter-of-fact explanations blend strengths and difficulties. Bianca, who has dyslexia, “love[s] learning by doing things”; Manuel, who has ADHD, “can get frustrated when [they] really feel the need to move around even though [they’re] supposed to sit still.” Though the number of conditions may tax younger readers’ attention spans, kids with those conditions who “don’t feel ready to explain” will appreciate the text’s inclusiveness; as Sonia acknowledges, “Not everyone is comfortable answering questions about themselves.” Enlivening the familiar theme, López’s bold figures, vibrant colors, and close perspective welcome readers into a garden bursting with assorted blossoms, insects, and birds. Refreshingly, most characters present as kids of color of various heritages, ranging from black and Latinx to South and Southeast Asian. One presents white.

An affirmative, delightfully diverse overview of disabilities. (Informational picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 3, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-525-51412-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Philomel

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

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This well-told and exquisitely illustrated story of a musician with a steep career trajectory will inspire young readers to...

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  • Caldecott Honor Book

  • Coretta Scott King Book Award Winner

TROMBONE SHORTY

An autobiographical tale of a young man who started making “musical gumbo” at age 4.

Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews relates how he grew up in Tremé in New Orleans, American’s oldest black neighborhood, where he heard music everywhere. Young Troy admires his big brother’s trumpet playing and makes music without instruments with his friends. After finding a discarded trombone, the little boy teaches himself to play. Troy narrates: “I was so small that sometimes I fell right over…because it was so heavy.” (Despite Collier’s illustrations of young “Shorty,” nothing prepares readers for his size in the parade photograph in the backmatter.) When Bo Diddley hears him playing in the crowd at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, the jazz great invites him to the stage. An author’s note explains that Troy started a band at age 6 and joined Lenny Kravitz’s band at 19. Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, his band, tours the world, and Troy shares New Orleans music and culture through his foundation and music academy. Employing his unmistakable mixed-media collage images, Collier portrays the story of this living legend with energy and style, making visible the swirling sounds of jazz.

This well-told and exquisitely illustrated story of a musician with a steep career trajectory will inspire young readers to pursue their passions, despite the challenges. (illustrator’s note) (Picture book/biography. 4-8)

Pub Date: April 14, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-4197-1465-8

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Abrams

Review Posted Online: Jan. 20, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2015

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A beautifully designed book that will resonate with children and the adults who wisely share it with them.

NELSON MANDELA

An inspirational ode to the life of the great South African leader by an award-winning author and illustrator.

Mandela’s has been a monumental life, a fact made clear on the front cover, which features an imposing, full-page portrait. The title is on the rear cover. His family gave him the Xhosa name Rolihlahla, but his schoolteacher called him Nelson. Later, he was sent to study with village elders who told him stories about his beautiful and fertile land, which was conquered by European settlers with more powerful weapons. Then came apartheid, and his protests, rallies and legal work for the cause of racial equality led to nearly 30 years of imprisonment followed at last by freedom for Mandela and for all South Africans. “The ancestors, / The people, / The world, / Celebrated.” Nelson’s writing is spare, poetic, and grounded in empathy and admiration. His oil paintings on birch plywood are muscular and powerful. Dramatic moments are captured in shifting perspectives; a whites-only beach is seen through a wide-angle lens, while faces behind bars and faces beaming in final victory are masterfully portrayed in close-up.

A beautifully designed book that will resonate with children and the adults who wisely share it with them. (author’s note, bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 5-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 2, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-06-178374-6

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Nov. 19, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2012

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