THE SNOW PRINCESS

Sanderson tells a romantic tale of the daughter of Father Frost and Mother Spring. The Snow Princess can call snow at will, but her parents remind her that she must never open her heart to falling in love. She goes off to see the world—the forests, the animals, and most of all, the people. When it’s time for the winter fair, she’s enchanted by the dancing, singing, and merriment, and touched by the attention of one Sergei. Although she runs away, and a great snowstorm comes up, her heart is full of him. She finds Sergei, lost in the melting snow, and her heart melts, too. It is easy to underestimate the power of Sanderson’s exquisite oil paintings, with their glowing textures and near-perfect detail. Most of the full-page, full-bleed illustrations are done in every shade and tonality of blue, from ice to midnight, and she uses the washed gold of winter sunlight to pick out other effects. The page spread of the Snow Princess in her snowflake-studded, ermine-trimmed cloak, her dark hair afloat, with her hand resting on a striding polar bear, will make little girls in particular swoon. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2004

ISBN: 0-316-77982-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2004

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A sweet, soft conversation starter and a charming gift.

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BECAUSE I HAD A TEACHER

A paean to teachers and their surrogates everywhere.

This gentle ode to a teacher’s skill at inspiring, encouraging, and being a role model is spoken, presumably, from a child’s viewpoint. However, the voice could equally be that of an adult, because who can’t look back upon teachers or other early mentors who gave of themselves and offered their pupils so much? Indeed, some of the self-aware, self-assured expressions herein seem perhaps more realistic as uttered from one who’s already grown. Alternatively, readers won’t fail to note that this small book, illustrated with gentle soy-ink drawings and featuring an adult-child bear duo engaged in various sedentary and lively pursuits, could just as easily be about human parent- (or grandparent-) child pairs: some of the softly colored illustrations depict scenarios that are more likely to occur within a home and/or other family-oriented setting. Makes sense: aren’t parents and other close family members children’s first teachers? This duality suggests that the book might be best shared one-on-one between a nostalgic adult and a child who’s developed some self-confidence, having learned a thing or two from a parent, grandparent, older relative, or classroom instructor.

A sweet, soft conversation starter and a charming gift. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: March 1, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-943200-08-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Compendium

Review Posted Online: Dec. 14, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2017

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A DOG NAMED SAM

A book that will make young dog-owners smile in recognition and confirm dogless readers' worst suspicions about the mayhem caused by pets, even winsome ones. Sam, who bears passing resemblance to an affable golden retriever, is praised for fetching the family newspaper, and goes on to fetch every other newspaper on the block. In the next story, only the children love Sam's swimming; he is yelled at by lifeguards and fishermen alike when he splashes through every watering hole he can find. Finally, there is woe to the entire family when Sam is bored and lonely for one long night. Boland has an essential message, captured in both both story and illustrations of this Easy-to-Read: Kids and dogs belong together, especially when it's a fun-loving canine like Sam. An appealing tale. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: April 1, 1996

ISBN: 0-8037-1530-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1996

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