A biography LGBTQ rights activists and allies can proudly share with children.

PRIDE

THE STORY OF HARVEY MILK AND THE RAINBOW FLAG

A hope-filled ode to the rainbow flag, the LGBTQ rights movement’s most prominent symbol.

The flag’s story begins with Harvey Milk, a young man with a “dream” for equality. In 1977, Milk becomes one of the first openly gay people to be elected to U.S. political office. As Milk marches toward his dream through protests and rallies, he works with artist Gilbert Baker to come up with a unifying symbol for the movement. In 1978, the rainbow flag makes its debut in San Francisco. Later that year, Milk is assassinated, but the flag continues to unify, sending his message of hope to LGBTQ individuals all over the world. Milk’s flag becomes “a dream for us all.” Though he mentions Baker, Sanders spotlights Milk instead as the flag’s mastermind. The text mentions some iterations of the flag but stops short of including those revisions that match identities often excluded from the movement. Still, the visual references to important LGBTQ milestones will make supporters cheer. Salerno’s retro style—detailed but fluid drawings of figures set against paisley-patterned backgrounds—gives fitting, ’70s-era bohemian undertones. The crowds Milk addresses are largely as white as he is, but later illustrations nod to diversity within the LGBTQ population. Photographs of Milk, Baker, and other moments in the movement are appended.

A biography LGBTQ rights activists and allies can proudly share with children. (biographical notes, timeline, bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 4-9)

Pub Date: April 10, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-399-55531-2

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Jan. 22, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2018

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A larger-than-life subject is neatly captured in text and images.

THURGOOD

The life journey of the first African American to serve on the United States Supreme Court and the incidents that formed him.

Thurgood Marshall grew up in segregated Baltimore, Maryland, with a family that encouraged him to stand for justice. Despite attending poor schools, he found a way to succeed. His father instilled in him a love of the law and encouraged him to argue like a lawyer during dinner conversations. His success in college meant he could go to law school, but the University of Maryland did not accept African American students. Instead, Marshall went to historically black Howard University, where he was mentored by civil rights lawyer Charles Houston. Marshall’s first major legal case was against the law school that denied him a place, and his success brought him to the attention of the NAACP and ultimately led to his work on the groundbreaking Brown v. Board of Education, which itself led to his appointment to the Supreme Court. This lively narrative serves as an introduction to the life of one of the country’s important civil rights figures. Important facts in Marshall’s life are effectively highlighted in an almost staccato fashion. The bold watercolor-and-collage illustrations, beginning with an enticing cover, capture and enhance the strong tone set by the words.

A larger-than-life subject is neatly captured in text and images. (author’s note, photos) (Picture book/biography. 5-9)

Pub Date: Sept. 3, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5247-6533-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Schwartz & Wade/Random

Review Posted Online: June 10, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2019

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Lovely illustrations wasted on this misguided project.

LUNAR NEW YEAR

From the Celebrate the World series

The Celebrate the World series spotlights Lunar New Year.

This board book blends expository text and first-person-plural narrative, introducing readers to the holiday. Chau’s distinctive, finely textured watercolor paintings add depth, transitioning smoothly from a grand cityscape to the dining room table, from fantasies of the past to dumplings of the present. The text attempts to provide a broad look at the subject, including other names for the celebration, related cosmology, and historical background, as well as a more-personal discussion of traditions and practices. Yet it’s never clear who the narrator is—while the narrative indicates the existence of some consistent, monolithic group who participates in specific rituals of celebration (“Before the new year celebrations begin, we clean our homes—and ourselves!”), the illustrations depict different people in every image. Indeed, observances of Lunar New Year are as diverse as the people who celebrate it, which neither the text nor the images—all of the people appear to be Asian—fully acknowledges. Also unclear is the book’s intended audience. With large blocks of explication on every spread, it is entirely unappealing for the board-book set, and the format may make it equally unattractive to an older, more appropriate audience. Still, readers may appreciate seeing an important celebration warmly and vibrantly portrayed.

Lovely illustrations wasted on this misguided project. (Board book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Dec. 11, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5344-3303-8

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Little Simon/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: Dec. 5, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2019

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