PEANUT AND PEARL’S PICNIC ADVENTURE

Peanut and Pearl, next-door neighbors and best friends, decide to go on a picnic together. Peanut packs a passel of corn cakes, and Pearl brings a plum pie. When both critters—and, since these are mammals of unreported species, we can only call them that—lead the way in opposite directions, both end up lost. While easygoing Peanut relaxes with his picnic fare, vigilant Pearl looks for her lost buddy, behind the smallest tree, behind the biggest tree and finally by the lake, where she finds Peanut wiping sleep out of his eyes. With very predictable plot and vocabulary, readable font and a humorous situation, Dotlich’s latest is just what new readers need to build their confidence. Alley’s comical illustrations add to the text, helping the new reader figure out any challenging words. An excellent addition to the classic I Can Read series, this is one that will be read over and over. (Easy reader. 4-6)

Pub Date: July 1, 2007

ISBN: 978-0-06-054920-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2007

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Uncomplicated and worthwhile for any age.

THE THANKFUL BOOK

Parr focuses his simplistic childlike art and declarative sentences on gratitude for the pleasures and wonders of a child’s everyday life.

Using images of both kids and animals, each colorful scene in bold primary colors declaims a reason to be thankful. “I am thankful for my hair because it makes me unique” shows a yellow-faced child with a wild purple coiffure, indicating self-esteem. An elephant with large pink ears happily exclaims, “I am thankful for my ears because they let me hear words like ‘I love you.’ ” Humor is interjected with, “I am thankful for underwear because I like to wear it on my head.” (Parents will hope that it is clean, but potty-humor–loving children probably won’t care.) Children are encouraged to be thankful for feet, music, school, vacations and the library, “because it is filled with endless adventures,” among other things. The book’s cheery, upbeat message is clearly meant to inspire optimistic gratitude; Parr exhorts children to “remember some [things to be thankful for] every day.”

Uncomplicated and worthwhile for any age. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Oct. 16, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-316-18101-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: Aug. 29, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2012

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

KINDERGARTEN ROCKS!

Young Dexter Dugan is just days away from starting kindergarten and his stuffed dog, Rufus, is a teensy bit scared. Dexter’s sister, Jessie, having passed through the rigors of kindergarten, is now a third grader and patiently guides him through some of his fears. She helps Rufus, or perhaps Dexter, make a list of the things that worry him about school. A page per fear drifts off the desk and shows the reader, for example, “What if I get lost?” and “Are there mean people?” As it turns out, the teacher is sweet and the activities are absorbing. The lunchroom is like a restaurant and recess is so exciting that all fears are forgotten—until Rufus goes missing. Once again, Jessie lends a hand and by the final bell, Dexter and Rufus are sure that kindergarten does indeed rock. The illustrations, in brilliant shades of crayon-like texture, lend a beguilingly childlike look. Told from a kid’s perspective, this is bound to boost confidence at facing fears and is a terrific tool for those setting off on the elementary track. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: July 1, 2005

ISBN: 0-15-204932-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harcourt

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2005

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more