She pricks a discreet hole in daddy’s paper cup at breakfast. “Daddy doesn’t look happy,” deadpans Tilly; he sure doesn’t,...

TILLY THE TRICKSTER

Young Tilly is not just a trickster; she is a wayward imp of the just-this-side-of-mean school of mischief making.

She pricks a discreet hole in daddy’s paper cup at breakfast. “Daddy doesn’t look happy,” deadpans Tilly; he sure doesn’t, and Hoyt catches his appalled, rubbery face to a T. She tricks her teacher into eating a hot cinnamon cookie disguised as a strawberry treat (the teacher is not amused, nor is the school principal: “I am not pleased with her petty little pranks,” he says to her hastily summoned parents). But when Tilly fills her brother’s Oreo with toothpaste, making him sick in the process, doubts start to cloud her conscience. And when her family turns the tables and fills her slippers with shaving cream—ay caramba!—enough with the tricks…until tomorrow (which promises to involve a spider). Clearly, Tilly’s pique of conscience is only a glancing episode; she’s really just a naughty girl. Hoyt’s artwork is a delightful throwback to the Little Rascals’ world—not guileless; actually rather difficult—and in keeping with that television program, the dog—here, a jowly, spindle-legged bulldog—steals the show.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-4197-0030-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Abrams

Review Posted Online: April 5, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2011

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A delectable bilingual experience.

¡VAMOS! LET'S GO EAT

From the ¡Vamos! series

Little Lobo is tasked with nourishing nine famished luchadores.

Following ¡Vamos! Let’s Go to the Market (2019), author/illustrator Raúl the Third and colorist Bay create a second installment in their bilingual series, ¡Vamos!, here following Little Lobo’s journey as he provides sustenance to hungry lucha libre stars. The cheerfully energetic anthropomorphic wolf reprises his role as a bike courier when he receives a message from El Toro and makes his way to el Coliseo, winding and weaving through busy streets. A mouthwatering experience follows as Little Lobo—accompanied by dog Bernabé and rooster pal Kooky Dooky—picks up tacos, diced fruit, freshly made tortillas, flan, and buñuelos from a gathering of food trucks. As in his other work, Raúl the Third imbues his pages with real-world and pop-culture references. An homage to Picasso’s Guernica, recognizable Ciudad Juárez–El Paso landmarks, a Chavo del Ocho inside a barrel, and even a Chapulín Colorado marionette all make the cut. Readers ignorant of these specifics will not feel left out: The busy pages filled with interesting characters and intriguing bilingual signage make readers wish they could jump into the pages and experience the bustling town. Bay’s comic book–style coloring and creative textures provide a deep cultural exposure to the lavish array of Mexican food throughout the spreads. After enjoying the story, readers will keep going back to savor all the minuscule details.

A delectable bilingual experience. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: March 24, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-328-55704-9

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Versify/HMH

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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An invitation to wonder, imagine and look at everything (humans included) in a new way.

NOAH CHASES THE WIND

A young boy sees things a little differently than others.

Noah can see patterns in the dust when it sparkles in the sunlight. And if he puts his nose to the ground, he can smell the “green tang of the ants in the grass.” His most favorite thing of all, however, is to read. Noah has endless curiosity about how and why things work. Books open the door to those answers. But there is one question the books do not explain. When the wind comes whistling by, where does it go? Noah decides to find out. In a chase that has a slight element of danger—wind, after all, is unpredictable—Noah runs down streets, across bridges, near a highway, until the wind lifts him off his feet. Cowman’s gusty wisps show each stream of air turning a different jewel tone, swirling all around. The ribbons gently bring Noah home, setting him down under the same thinking tree where he began. Did it really happen? Worthington’s sensitive exploration leaves readers with their own set of questions and perhaps gratitude for all types of perspective. An author’s note mentions children on the autism spectrum but widens to include all who feel a little different.

An invitation to wonder, imagine and look at everything (humans included) in a new way. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: April 14, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-60554-356-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Redleaf Lane

Review Posted Online: Feb. 3, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2015

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