A capable historical romance featuring games of chance and games of the heart.

NEVER KISS A DUKE

From the Hazards of Dukes series , Vol. 1

A sudden loss of nobility leads a former duke to his future bride.

When is a duke not a duke? When he’s Sebastian de Silva and he’s just been informed that his parents were not legally married, so his claim to be the Duke of Hasford is null and void. Unsure how to handle this abrupt change in circumstances, he and his friend Nash stumble into Miss Ivy’s, a new gambling house gaining renown for allowing any person with sufficient funds to play. He’s immediately interested in the proprietor, Ivy Holton, a ruined aristocrat who chose to open her own establishment rather than marry the man who'd won her hand from her father in a wager. Though she also finds him attractive, he ends up working for her, and he needs to stay employed for the first time in his life, meaning he can’t pursue her. As they continue to work together, however, there are multiple chances for the two to explore the chemistry that’s obvious to everybody but them—and finally, a “spectacular opportunity” presents itself and the two kiss. Ivy immediately apologizes for taking advantage of an employee, though soon after she and Sebastian agree that “it wasn’t just a kiss,” and a relationship begins to bloom. But if anything is to come of their attraction, Sebastian will have to make his peace with his new place in the world, and Ivy will have to decide whether she is willing to sacrifice her hard-won independence. This is the first entry in Frampton’s new Hazards of Dukes series, and if it does not quite live up to the magic of her earlier books, it’s still satisfying. Though Frampton (Never a Bride, 2019, etc.) is able as ever in developing promising subplots and a strong heroine, the tension of the plot is frequently lost, and Sebastian’s motivations can seem muddled. Despite this, both hero and heroine are likable, their amorous scenes are delightfully steamy, and Frampton has set up future installments well enough that readers can look forward to them.

A capable historical romance featuring games of chance and games of the heart.

Pub Date: Jan. 28, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-06-286742-1

Page Count: 384

Publisher: Avon/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Nov. 25, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2019

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Packed with riveting drama and painful truths, this book powerfully illustrates the devastation of abuse—and the strength of...

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IT ENDS WITH US

Hoover’s (November 9, 2015, etc.) latest tackles the difficult subject of domestic violence with romantic tenderness and emotional heft.

At first glance, the couple is edgy but cute: Lily Bloom runs a flower shop for people who hate flowers; Ryle Kincaid is a surgeon who says he never wants to get married or have kids. They meet on a rooftop in Boston on the night Ryle loses a patient and Lily attends her abusive father’s funeral. The provocative opening takes a dark turn when Lily receives a warning about Ryle’s intentions from his sister, who becomes Lily’s employee and close friend. Lily swears she’ll never end up in another abusive home, but when Ryle starts to show all the same warning signs that her mother ignored, Lily learns just how hard it is to say goodbye. When Ryle is not in the throes of a jealous rage, his redeeming qualities return, and Lily can justify his behavior: “I think we needed what happened on the stairwell to happen so that I would know his past and we’d be able to work on it together,” she tells herself. Lily marries Ryle hoping the good will outweigh the bad, and the mother-daughter dynamics evolve beautifully as Lily reflects on her childhood with fresh eyes. Diary entries fancifully addressed to TV host Ellen DeGeneres serve as flashbacks to Lily’s teenage years, when she met her first love, Atlas Corrigan, a homeless boy she found squatting in a neighbor’s house. When Atlas turns up in Boston, now a successful chef, he begs Lily to leave Ryle. Despite the better option right in front of her, an unexpected complication forces Lily to cut ties with Atlas, confront Ryle, and try to end the cycle of abuse before it’s too late. The relationships are portrayed with compassion and honesty, and the author’s note at the end that explains Hoover’s personal connection to the subject matter is a must-read.

Packed with riveting drama and painful truths, this book powerfully illustrates the devastation of abuse—and the strength of the survivors.

Pub Date: Aug. 2, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-5011-1036-8

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Atria

Review Posted Online: May 31, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2016

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Miller makes Homer pertinent to women facing 21st-century monsters.

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CIRCE

A retelling of ancient Greek lore gives exhilarating voice to a witch.

“Monsters are a boon for gods. Imagine all the prayers.” So says Circe, a sly, petulant, and finally commanding voice that narrates the entirety of Miller’s dazzling second novel. The writer returns to Homer, the wellspring that led her to an Orange Prize for The Song of Achilles (2012). This time, she dips into The Odyssey for the legend of Circe, a nymph who turns Odysseus’ crew of men into pigs. The novel, with its distinctive feminist tang, starts with the sentence: “When I was born, the name for what I was did not exist.” Readers will relish following the puzzle of this unpromising daughter of the sun god Helios and his wife, Perse, who had negligible use for their child. It takes banishment to the island Aeaea for Circe to sense her calling as a sorceress: “I will not be like a bird bred in a cage, I thought, too dull to fly even when the door stands open. I stepped into those woods and my life began.” This lonely, scorned figure learns herbs and potions, surrounds herself with lions, and, in a heart-stopping chapter, outwits the monster Scylla to propel Daedalus and his boat to safety. She makes lovers of Hermes and then two mortal men. She midwifes the birth of the Minotaur on Crete and performs her own C-section. And as she grows in power, she muses that “not even Odysseus could talk his way past [her] witchcraft. He had talked his way past the witch instead.” Circe’s fascination with mortals becomes the book’s marrow and delivers its thrilling ending. All the while, the supernatural sits intriguingly alongside “the tonic of ordinary things.” A few passages coil toward melodrama, and one inelegant line after a rape seems jarringly modern, but the spell holds fast. Expect Miller’s readership to mushroom like one of Circe’s spells.

Miller makes Homer pertinent to women facing 21st-century monsters.

Pub Date: April 10, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-316-55634-7

Page Count: 400

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: Jan. 23, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2018

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