The simplicity of the suggested idea that homemade fruit juice will always be fun to make and delicious to drink is...

ALICIA'S FRUITY DRINKS / LAS AGUAS FRESCAS DE ALICIA

The fruit-blended juice drinks known as aguas frescas offered at a fair inspire a little girl and her mother to serve their own version after soccer practice.

Alicia really likes the taste of these fruit drinks and learns from her mother that they can easily be made at home with a blender, fresh fruit, ice cubes and water. Mimicking the aguas frescas stand with all its flavors, they try out strawberries, cantaloupe, watermelon and pineapple. Alicia wonders if sugar should be added to the recipe, but mother says that the fruit itself provides enough sweetness and is much healthier than sodas. When a soccer teammate needs testing for diabetes, Alicia’s invitation to have the team over for her fruity drinks also encourages everyone to avoid drinking the canned soda by trying a delicious substitute. The dual English/Spanish text is augmented by summery scenes in opaque, rich colors. The not-so-subtle message that diabetes, sugar and lack of exercise can all be related adds a didactic, cautionary tone to the otherwise pleasant story of sisterhood through soccer.

The simplicity of the suggested idea that homemade fruit juice will always be fun to make and delicious to drink is appealing. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: May 31, 2012

ISBN: 978-1-55885-705-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Piñata Books/Arte Público

Review Posted Online: April 18, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2012

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Make space for this clever blend of science and self-realization.

A PLACE FOR PLUTO

If Pluto can’t be a planet—then what is he?

Having been a regular planet for “the better part of forever,” Pluto is understandably knocked out of orbit by his sudden exclusion. With Charon and his four other moons in tow he sets off in search of a new identity. Unfortunately, that only spins him into further gloom, as he doesn’t have a tail like his friend Halley’s comet, is too big to join Ida and the other asteroids, and feels disinclined to try to crash into Earth like meteoroids Gem and Persi. Then, just as he’s about to plunge into a black hole of despair, an encounter with a whole quartet of kindred spheroids led by Eris rocks his world…and a follow-up surprise party thrown by an apologetic Saturn (“Dwarf planet has a nice RING to it”) and the other seven former colleagues literally puts him “over the moon.” Demmer gives all the heavenly bodies big eyes (some, including the feminine Saturn, with long lashes) and, on occasion, short arms along with distinctive identifying colors or markings. Dressing the troublemaking meteoroids in do-rags and sunglasses sounds an off note. Without mentioning that the reclassification is still controversial, Wade closes with a (somewhat) straighter account of Pluto’s current official status and the reasons for it.

Make space for this clever blend of science and self-realization. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-68446-004-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Capstone Young Readers

Review Posted Online: April 25, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2018

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Young readers with a fondness for amphibians will jump all over this one. (Fiction. 6-8)

STINK AND THE FREAKY FROG FREAKOUT

From the Stink series , Vol. 8

Stink Moody, younger brother of Judy, hops into the spotlight with a common problem—and  one that’s a bit more unusual.

Stink would like to advance in his swimming lessons, but he’s afraid to put his face underwater and seems doomed to remain a Polliwog forever. Fortunately, he’s distracted from that issue by the sudden appearance around town—in some surprising places—of a whole lot of real frogs, a few of which are deformed. These frogs give McDonald the opportunity to offer a little information, through the voice of a nature-center guide, on how adverse environmental conditions can influence frog development. Stink memorizes a variety of frog sounds, enabling him to participate in a frog count at a local pond. Somehow, he becomes convinced that he’s turning into a frog himself, but that might just make it possible for him to swim underwater. Brief, cheery, oversized text and lot of cartoonish black-and-white illustrations (only some of which were available for review) make this a good choice for newly independent readers. A minor issue is that the text informs readers that it is early spring; even in Virginia, that’s a little early for Stink to be taking swimming lessons in an outdoor pool, as indicated in the illustrations.

Young readers with a fondness for amphibians will jump all over this one. (Fiction. 6-8)

Pub Date: Feb. 12, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-7636-6140-3

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: Dec. 26, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2013

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