An upbeat, useful, and wide-ranging look at recovering from injuries—and preventing them.

PLAY FOREVER

HOW TO RECOVER FROM INJURY AND THRIVE

A comprehensive guide focuses on physical injury and recovery.

Everyone gets hurt, Stone writes bluntly at the beginning of his book, and it’s possible to come back from an injury faster and fitter than ever. But to accomplish this, the injured “need information on how to do so, what can help them, and how they can motivate themselves,” he writes. “They need to recognize the recovery process as long, entwined with their habits and mindset, and affected by a large variety of factors.” For years, the author, a physician, has built a practice giving this help to everybody from professional athletes to older patients dealing with issues like arthritis. This manual is the distillation of all that he’s learned about both the physical and psychological dimensions of injuries. He thus mixes a lot of practical advice—about things like posture, nutrition, and exercise—with broader philosophical observations about the active lifestyle, urging his readers to attend to the little problems so as to head off the larger ones. Ignore those minor difficulties, he asserts, and issues will accumulate: “Pay attention, and you can live well until the day you die.” Stone’s writing displays a light, very engaging tone that’s partial to both attractive idealism and puckish humor (when advocating at least 30 minutes of sunlight exposure every day, for instance, he recommends skinny-dipping). And he wards off accusations that he’s enabling irresponsible thrill-seekers with neat bravado: “To live without any risk entirely is both impossible and foolish.” His counsel on everything from skiing to rock climbing is both informed and encouraging to readers of all ages. And the helpful tips are all delivered with a calm, confident optimism that will be uplifting, particularly to readers who think they may never bounce back from their latest injuries.

An upbeat, useful, and wide-ranging look at recovering from injuries—and preventing them.

Pub Date: Dec. 6, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-5445-2676-8

Page Count: 480

Publisher: Lioncrest Publishing

Review Posted Online: Jan. 17, 2022

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Gates offers a persuasive, 30,000-foot view of a global problem that, he insists, can be prevented given will and money.

HOW TO PREVENT THE NEXT PANDEMIC

The tech mogul recounts the health care–related dimensions of his foundation in what amounts to a long policy paper.

“Outbreaks are inevitable, but pandemics are optional.” Thus states the epidemiologist Larry Brilliant, a Gates adviser, who hits on a critically important point: Disease is a fact of nature, but a pandemic is a political creation of a kind. Therefore, there are political as well as medical solutions that can enlist governments as well as scientists to contain outbreaks and make sure they don’t explode into global disasters. One critical element, Gates writes, is to alleviate the gap between high- and low-income countries, the latter of which suffer disproportionately from outbreaks. Another is to convince governments to ramp up production of vaccines that are “universal”—i.e., applicable to an existing range of disease agents, especially respiratory pathogens such as coronaviruses and flus—to prepare the world’s populations for the inevitable. “Doing the right thing early pays huge dividends later,” writes Gates. Even though doing the right thing is often expensive, the author urges that it’s a wise investment and one that has never been attempted—e.g., developing a “global corps” of scientists and aid workers “whose job is to wake up every day thinking about diseases that could kill huge numbers of people.” To those who object that such things are easier said than done, Gates counters that the development of the current range of Covid vaccines was improbably fast, taking a third of the time that would normally have been required. At the same time, the author examines some of the social changes that came about through the pandemic, including the “new normal” of distance working and learning—both of which, he urges, stand to be improved but need not be abandoned.

Gates offers a persuasive, 30,000-foot view of a global problem that, he insists, can be prevented given will and money.

Pub Date: May 3, 2022

ISBN: 978-0-593-53448-9

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: April 13, 2022

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2022

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A conversational, pleasurable look into McConaughey’s life and thought.

Reader Votes

  • Readers Vote
  • 20

Our Verdict

  • Our Verdict
  • GET IT

  • New York Times Bestseller

  • IndieBound Bestseller

GREENLIGHTS

All right, all right, all right: The affable, laconic actor delivers a combination of memoir and self-help book.

“This is an approach book,” writes McConaughey, adding that it contains “philosophies that can be objectively understood, and if you choose, subjectively adopted, by either changing your reality, or changing how you see it. This is a playbook, based on adventures in my life.” Some of those philosophies come in the form of apothegms: “When you can design your own weather, blow in the breeze”; “Simplify, focus, conserve to liberate.” Others come in the form of sometimes rambling stories that never take the shortest route from point A to point B, as when he recounts a dream-spurred, challenging visit to the Malian musician Ali Farka Touré, who offered a significant lesson in how disagreement can be expressed politely and without rancor. Fans of McConaughey will enjoy his memories—which line up squarely with other accounts in Melissa Maerz’s recent oral history, Alright, Alright, Alright—of his debut in Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused, to which he contributed not just that signature phrase, but also a kind of too-cool-for-school hipness that dissolves a bit upon realizing that he’s an older guy on the prowl for teenage girls. McConaughey’s prep to settle into the role of Wooderson involved inhabiting the mind of a dude who digs cars, rock ’n’ roll, and “chicks,” and he ran with it, reminding readers that the film originally had only three scripted scenes for his character. The lesson: “Do one thing well, then another. Once, then once more.” It’s clear that the author is a thoughtful man, even an intellectual of sorts, though without the earnestness of Ethan Hawke or James Franco. Though some of the sentiments are greeting card–ish, this book is entertaining and full of good lessons.

A conversational, pleasurable look into McConaughey’s life and thought.

Pub Date: Oct. 20, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-593-13913-4

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: Oct. 27, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2020

Did you like this book?

more