EVERYONE LOVES CUPCAKE

A sweet follow-up to DiPucchio and Wight’s Everyone Loves Bacon (2015).

As in its predecessor, humorous, food-based wordplay abounds in the clever text about beloved, anthropomorphic Cupcake in her cafe community. After the opening, titular line, word-balloon text affirms Coffee’s love for Cupcake (“A latte!”) and (wedding) Cake’s, too (“I do”). Throughout, Wight’s illustrations augment the humor with clever touches such as the latte-art heart on Coffee’s surface. Meanwhile, Brownie is “nuts about her,” and Angel Food Cake loves everyone. But the Tarts are jealous. Their snide comments sting, especially because general insecurity is Cupcake’s bugaboo: “Cupcake worried a lot about what everyone thought, so she worked extra hard at being extra perfect.” Alas, her striving and declarations of effort eventually grate on the others, who begin to avoid her. Feeling “crummy,” Cupcake finds inspiration in words from, who else, (fortune) Cookie: “Be true. BE YOU.” But when Cupcake musters up the courage to voice her true feelings, the revelations (that her frosting is artificially colored and she hates birthday parties) don’t really connect to earlier parts of the story. Of course she’d hate birthday parties…where she’d be eaten, right? Forgoing frosting or sprinkles altogether would be more in tune with the anti-perfectionist message. While the climax thus seems incongruous, other treats’ revelations reinforce the humor of the text, and the conclusion is supersweet.

A picture-book treat. (Picture book. 3-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 6, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-374-30293-1

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: June 28, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2016

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Though Jim may have been grumpy because a chimp’s an ape and not a monkey, readers will enjoy and maybe learn from his...

GRUMPY MONKEY

It’s a wonderful day in the jungle, so why’s Jim Panzee so grumpy?

When Jim woke up, nothing was right: "The sun was too bright, the sky was too blue, and bananas were too sweet." Norman the gorilla asks Jim why he’s so grumpy, and Jim insists he’s not. They meet Marabou, to whom Norman confides that Jim’s grumpy. When Jim denies it again, Marabou points out that Jim’s shoulders are hunched; Jim stands up. When they meet Lemur, Lemur points out Jim’s bunchy eyebrows; Jim unbunches them. When he trips over Snake, Snake points out Jim’s frown…so Jim puts on a grimacelike smile. Everyone has suggestions to brighten his mood: dancing, singing, swinging, swimming…but Jim doesn’t feel like any of that. He gets so fed up, he yells at his animal friends and stomps off…then he feels sad about yelling. He and Norman (who regrets dancing with that porcupine) finally just have a sit and decide it’s a wonderful day to be grumpy—which, of course, makes them both feel a little better. Suzanne Lang’s encouragement to sit with your emotions (thus allowing them to pass) is nearly Buddhist in its take, and it will be great bibliotherapy for the crabby, cranky, and cross. Oscar-nominated animator Max Lang’s cartoony illustrations lighten the mood without making light of Jim’s mood; Jim has comically long arms, and his facial expressions are quite funny.

Though Jim may have been grumpy because a chimp’s an ape and not a monkey, readers will enjoy and maybe learn from his journey. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: May 15, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-553-53786-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Feb. 19, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2018

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As insubstantial as hot air.

THE WORLD NEEDS WHO YOU WERE MADE TO BE

A diverse cast of children first makes a fleet of hot air balloons and then takes to the sky in them.

Lifestyle maven Gaines uses this activity as a platform to celebrate diversity in learning and working styles. Some people like to work together; others prefer a solo process. Some take pains to plan extensively; others know exactly what they want and jump right in. Some apply science; others demonstrate artistic prowess. But “see how beautiful it can be when / our differences share the same sky?” Double-page spreads leading up to this moment of liftoff are laid out such that rhyming abcb quatrains typically contain one or two opposing concepts: “Some of us are teachers / and share what we know. / But all of us are learners. / Together is how we grow!” In the accompanying illustration, a bespectacled, Asian-presenting child at a blackboard lectures the other children on “balloon safety.” Gaines’ text has the ring of sincerity, but the sentiment is hardly an original one, and her verse frequently sacrifices scansion for rhyme. Sometimes it abandons both: “We may not look / or work or think the same, / but we all have an / important part to play.” Swaney’s delicate, pastel-hued illustrations do little to expand on the text, but they are pretty. (This book was reviewed digitally with 11.2-by-18.6-inch double-page spreads viewed at 70.7% of actual size.)

As insubstantial as hot air. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Nov. 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-4003-1423-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Tommy Nelson

Review Posted Online: Jan. 19, 2021

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