Simple and nurturing, this will likely be loved by many a parent-child pair.

JUST IN CASE YOU WANT TO FLY

Fogliano and Robinson (When’s My Birthday?, 2017) collaborate again, this time in the voice of a caregiver speaking to a beloved child.

“Just in case you want to fly / here’s some wind / and here’s the sky.” A smiling child looks out of an apartment window as clothes on a line sway in the wind. “Here’s a feather / here’s up high / and here’s a wing / from a butterfly”—the former is on a banner drawn by an airplane; the latter beckons visitors into a museum, both in a cityscape spread. More potential needs and wants are anticipated and solved with offers of a cherry for a snack, a rock to skip, a coin to wish, a joke. Some of the offers are comfort-driven and bedtime-themed: The final spread, “and here is a map / with an x on the spot / to find your way / home to me,” shows a child in bed being tucked in with a blanket covered with many of the objects from the book. Robinson’s recognizable collage-and-paint illustrations are sweet as ever, featuring children diverse in skin color and hair texture. The rhyming text reads almost like Goodnight Moon’s, although it has a more-explicit expression of love for the child listener.

Simple and nurturing, this will likely be loved by many a parent-child pair. (Picture book. 2-7)

Pub Date: Oct. 8, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-8234-4344-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Neal Porter/Holiday House

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

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This TV rerun in board-book form has nothing new to offer.

PEPPA'S GIANT PUMPKIN

From the Peppa Pig series

Peppa hopes to join her classmates in a Halloween pumpkin competition in this adaptation of a story from the popular British television program Peppa Pig.

With the help of Granny and Grandpa Pig, Peppa turns her giant pumpkin, which is the size of a compact car, into a jack-o’-lantern. The trio is flummoxed when it comes time to transport the pumpkin to the competition, so they call on Miss Rabbit and her helicopter to airlift the pumpkin to the festivities as Peppa and her grandparents ride inside. Peppa arrives just in time for the contest and wins the prize for best flying pumpkin. The scenes look as if they are pulled directly from the television show, right down to the rectangular framing of some of the scenes. While the story is literally nothing new, the text is serviceable, describing the action in two to three sentences per page. The pumpkin-shaped book and orange foil cover will likely attract youngsters, whether they are Peppa fans or not.

This TV rerun in board-book form has nothing new to offer. (Board book. 2-4)

Pub Date: July 30, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-338-33922-2

Page Count: 10

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Sept. 24, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2019

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Halloween is used merely as a backdrop; better holiday titles for young readers are available.

THE LITTLE GHOST WHO WAS A QUILT

A ghost learns to appreciate his differences.

The little ghost protagonist of this title is unusual. He’s a quilt, not a lightweight sheet like his parents and friends. He dislikes being different despite his mom’s reassurance that his ancestors also had unconventional appearances. Halloween makes the little ghost happy, though. He decides to watch trick-or-treaters by draping over a porch chair—but lands on a porch rail instead. A mom accompanying her daughter picks him up, wraps him around her chilly daughter, and brings him home with them! The family likes his looks and comforting warmth, and the little ghost immediately feels better about himself. As soon as he’s able to, he flies out through the chimney and muses happily that this adventure happened only due to his being a quilt. This odd but gently told story conveys the importance of self-respect and acceptance of one’s uniqueness. The delivery of this positive message has something of a heavy-handed feel and is rushed besides. It also isn’t entirely logical: The protagonist could have been a different type of covering; a blanket, for instance, might have enjoyed an identical experience. The soft, pleasing illustrations’ palette of tans, grays, white, black, some touches of color, and, occasionally, white text against black backgrounds suggest isolation, such as the ghost feels about himself. Most humans, including the trick-or-treating mom and daughter, have beige skin. (This book was reviewed digitally with 11-by-16.6-inch double-page spreads viewed at 66.2% of actual size.)

Halloween is used merely as a backdrop; better holiday titles for young readers are available. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-7352-6447-2

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Tundra Books

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2020

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