A lighter take on elections that’s full of Froggy favorites.

FROGGY FOR PRESIDENT!

From the Froggy series

The irrepressible Froggy runs for class president.

Froggy, seeing a poster at school for the class-president election, decides to run. When his teacher, Ms. Witherspoon, asks him what his platform is, he—in the silly humor readers have come to expect from Froggy—hops onto his desk and says, “This is!” After Ms. Witherspoon offers clarification, Froggy aims for more recess and snacks. Meanwhile, Frogilina also decides to run for class president, and her well-thought-out platform addresses issues of a more socially conscious nature. The familiar shticks of Froggy forgetting to put his clothes on, first seen in Froggy Gets Dressed (1992), and Froggy’s mother yelling “Frrooggyy”—seen in nearly all 29 previous Froggy books—are on display here, as is, of course, frequent onomatopoeia as Froggy makes his way through the day. They don’t feel worn, however—they feel like comfortable old friends. Remkiewicz’s brightly colored illustrations make excellent use of a variety of presentations—spots, full-page bleeds, and double-page spreads—and the lively cast of characters that inhabits Froggy-world does double duty as supporting characters and as visual segues to page turns. Other than a final endpaper showing Froggy and Frogilina holding a “Vote” sign, the empowerment aspect of voting isn’t addressed; rather, the story hints at the importance of wise platforms and endorses the idea of working together.

A lighter take on elections that’s full of Froggy favorites. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: May 12, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-451-47948-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: Feb. 26, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2020

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Uncomplicated and worthwhile for any age.

THE THANKFUL BOOK

Parr focuses his simplistic childlike art and declarative sentences on gratitude for the pleasures and wonders of a child’s everyday life.

Using images of both kids and animals, each colorful scene in bold primary colors declaims a reason to be thankful. “I am thankful for my hair because it makes me unique” shows a yellow-faced child with a wild purple coiffure, indicating self-esteem. An elephant with large pink ears happily exclaims, “I am thankful for my ears because they let me hear words like ‘I love you.’ ” Humor is interjected with, “I am thankful for underwear because I like to wear it on my head.” (Parents will hope that it is clean, but potty-humor–loving children probably won’t care.) Children are encouraged to be thankful for feet, music, school, vacations and the library, “because it is filled with endless adventures,” among other things. The book’s cheery, upbeat message is clearly meant to inspire optimistic gratitude; Parr exhorts children to “remember some [things to be thankful for] every day.”

Uncomplicated and worthwhile for any age. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Oct. 16, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-316-18101-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: Aug. 29, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2012

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Though books on childhood anxiety are numerous, it is worth making space on the shelf for this one.

WAY PAST WORRIED

Brock may be dressed like a superhero, but he sure doesn’t feel like one, as social anxieties threaten to rain on his fun    .

Juan’s superhero-themed birthday party is about to start, but Brock is feeling trepidatious about attending without his brother as his trusty sidekick. His costume does not fit quite right, and he is already running late, and soon Brock is “way past worried.” When he arrives at the party he takes some deep breaths but is still afraid to jump in and so hides behind a tree. Hiding in the same tree is the similarly nervous Nelly, who’s new to the neighborhood. Through the simple act of sharing their anxieties, the children find themselves ready to face their fears. This true-to-life depiction of social anxiety is simply but effectively rendered. While both Nelly and Brock try taking deep breathes to calm their anxieties without success, it is the act of sharing their worries in a safe space with someone who understands that ultimately brings relief. With similar themes, Brock’s tale would make a lovely companion for Tom Percival’s Ruby Finds a Worry (2019) on social-emotional–development bookshelves. Brock is depicted with black hair and tan skin, Nelly presents White, and peers at the party appear fairly diverse.

Though books on childhood anxiety are numerous, it is worth making space on the shelf for this one. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-8075-8686-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Whitman

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2020

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more