Those who are making the transition from diapers are sure to laugh, though it doesn’t really stand out from the other books...

VEGETABLES IN UNDERWEAR

A survey of underwear and opposites is leavened (as if talk of underwear needs to be made funnier) by anthropomorphized veggies.

There’s not much story here, though for kids who giggle at the merest mention of unmentionables, that won’t be an issue. Basically, a stalk of broccoli sheds his shirt and shorts on the copyright and dedication pages and then launches into a spiel about underwear. “I wear underwear! / You wear underwear! // … // There’s big underwear / and little underwear.” Underwear can also be dirty or clean, old or new, serious or funny, for boys or for girls, and for every day of the week. But though the colors and patterns may vary, apparently underwear cannot be boxers, and sadly, there’s no underwear for babies, who wear diapers. Different colors highlight opposites in the all-caps text, though not all these words indicate opposites, per se—the days of the week are in rainbow hues. Chapman’s digital artwork features brightly colored veggie characters with stick arms and legs against white backgrounds. Simple props provide context (like the flies around the hamper), while a red, dashed line indicates movement. Front endpapers introduce the clothes-wearing veggies, while closing endpapers show them in their underwear (or not, as is the case for Pea).

Those who are making the transition from diapers are sure to laugh, though it doesn’t really stand out from the other books in the underwear drawer. (Picture book. 2-5)

Pub Date: April 7, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-4197-1464-1

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Abrams Appleseed

Review Posted Online: Feb. 3, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2015

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UMBRELLA

Momo longed to carry the blue umbrella and wear the bright red rubber boots she had been given on her third birthday. But day after day Indian summer continued. Momo tried to tell mother she needed to carry the umbrella to nursery school because the sunshine bothered her eyes. But Mother didn't let her use the umbrella then or when she said the wind bothered her. At last, though, rain fell on the city pavements and Momo carried her umbrella and wore her red boots to school. One feels the urgency of Momo's wish. The pictures are full of the city's moods and the child's joy in a rainy day.

Pub Date: March 1, 1958

ISBN: 978-0-14-050240-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: Dec. 9, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1958

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Though this celebration of community is joyful, there just is not much here.

ONE LOVE

A sugary poem, very loosely based on the familiar song, lacks focus.

Using only the refrain from the original (“One love, one heart, let’s get together and feel all right!”), the reggae great’s daughter Cedella Marley sees this song as her “happy song” and adapts it for children. However, the adaptation robs it of life. After the opening lines, readers familiar with the original song (or the tourism advertisement for Jamaica) will be humming along only to be stopped by the bland lines that follow: “One love, what the flower gives the bee.” and then “One love, what Mother Earth gives the tree.” Brantley-Newton’s sunny illustrations perfectly reflect the saccharine quality of the text. Starting at the beginning of the day, readers see a little girl first in bed, under a photograph of Bob Marley, the sun streaming into her room, a bird at the window. Each spread is completely redundant—when the text is about family love, the illustration actually shows little hearts floating from her parents to the little girl. An image of a diverse group getting ready to plant a community garden, walking on top of a river accompanies the words “One love, like the river runs to the sea.”

Though this celebration of community is joyful, there just is not much here. (afterword) (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Oct. 5, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-4521-0224-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Chronicle Books

Review Posted Online: April 5, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2011

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