Very young readers may get a bit restless, but the book should leave them amused—and maybe a little hungry.

T. REX TIME MACHINE

There’s a theory that human nature never changes. People have the same wants and needs, no matter what time period they live in. This rule is even more true for dinosaurs.

Dinosaurs are always hungry, at least on the evidence of this graphic novel–esque picture book for young readers. When two dinosaurs encounter a time traveler, in a historic moment, their first thought is to eat him. And when the time machine flings them into the future to a bustling city full of strip malls, they just keep on eating. Nearly the entire plot of the book is a catalog of food they enjoy. Dinosaurs love doughnuts and microwaved noodles. Their meals are interrupted from time to time by the local police, who are not pleased to see tyrannosaurs in the convenience store. (The police force, and the other residents of the city, are refreshingly multicultural.) The main characters are so single-minded that the story becomes repetitive, and a little aimless, but there are some pretty good jokes along the way (“Hey! T. Rexes! Put your tiny, baby hands in the air!”), and the language is surprisingly poetic. (One dinosaur describes a microwave as “the sun in a box.”) The art is also appealingly primitive (no pun intended). Each tyrannosaur is basically a collection of rectangles perched on one another.

Very young readers may get a bit restless, but the book should leave them amused—and maybe a little hungry. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 4, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-4521-6154-9

Page Count: 44

Publisher: Chronicle Books

Review Posted Online: June 25, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A simple but important lesson about anxiety that will speak to young worrywarts everywhere.

THERE'S A UNICORN IN YOUR BOOK

From the Who's in Your Book? series

A troubled little unicorn needs serious help.

There are “worry gremlins” all around threatening his peace of mind. Kids will feel engaged and empowered as they follow the directions to get these gremlins out of the picture. Young readers are told to “wiggle your fingers to make some magic dust,” tickle the unicorn, tell him a joke, and shake the book. None of these tactics quite do the trick, since the gremlins keep coming back and Unicorn’s horn gets stuck in the page. A gentler shake frees the horn, and the text offers another solution, one that kids can take to heart—“The best way to get rid of a worry is to tell someone about it.” Luckily, Unicorn’s friend Monster, an innocuous blue being with tiny pink horns, is there for Unicorn to whisper his worries to. Readers are also urged to whisper something encouraging to Unicorn, who thereafter feels much better. Fears allayed, he and his friends indulge in an exuberant celebration. Kids can join in as they happily sing together against a double-page spread of stars, rays of light, fairies, and disappearing gremlins. The digital illustrations are humorous, and varying typefaces and energetic page reveals add to the fun. This entry in the Who’s in Your Book? series follows the same pattern as the others and includes characters from the previous books.

A simple but important lesson about anxiety that will speak to young worrywarts everywhere. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Jan. 4, 2022

ISBN: 978-0-593-43476-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Nov. 16, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2021

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A kissing cousin to Bob Shea’s Dinosaur vs.… series.

DINOSAUR KISSES

Chomping and stomping come naturally to an exuberant dinosaur hatchling. Kissing? That takes practice.

Emerging from her egg at a run, Dinah STOMPS her fat legs and CHOMPS weeds with her sharp teeth. Kissing, though, turns out to be a challenge. After sending one hapless victim flying with a head butt and another inadvertently down the hatch (“Whoops,” she says. “Not good”), she returns to the hatchery…just in time to welcome a new sib with kisses—the sort that involve chomping, stomping and delighted head butts (“WHOMP!”). Drawn in thick outlines with a huge grin, wide eyes and a mottled yellow hide, Dinah stumps her way through minimally detailed prehistoric landscapes populated with anxious-looking smaller creatures. Children who groove on wimpy little butterfly kisses had best look elsewhere.

A kissing cousin to Bob Shea’s Dinosaur vs.… series. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Aug. 6, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-7636-6104-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 8, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2013

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more