Still, parents of children with new glasses prescriptions may find this novelty useful for their home libraries—public...

GLASSES TO GO

A clever concept presents a variety of different faces and separate pairs of glasses to try on each, executed with eye-catching graphics designed to appeal to hip young parents.

Unfortunately, it's difficult to imagine a board-book–age child understanding the concepts or being able to manipulate the pieces of this book. Bright blue, black, gray, white and silver graphics highlight different kinds of glasses for a variety of positions and uses: a pilot, a rock star, for reading, for calculating, for "someone totally FAB," for someone looking for romance, for a birthday party. Cutouts of seven styles of glasses are included in a pocket in the front, to be inserted in a very small tab on the corresponding page. However, only five slots are available to receive tabs, and inserting the tab requires a degree of manual dexterity that is not realistic for young children. Fortunately, once inserted, the glasses seem to stay inserted, even with repeated page turns. Some of the metaphors (“true love is blind,” for example) are also beyond the understanding of literal-minded young children.

Still, parents of children with new glasses prescriptions may find this novelty useful for their home libraries—public libraries will want to give it a miss. (Board book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Nov. 11, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-4814-1791-4

Page Count: 16

Publisher: Little Simon/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: Nov. 4, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2015

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A cozy year-round delight.

I LOVE YOU ALL YEAR THROUGH

Animal caregivers express their love for their little ones throughout the seasons in this addition to the “I love you” shelf.

Markers of the seasons loom large in this salute to parent-child bonds—spring blossoms and rains, autumn leaves, the summer sun and haze. “I love you in the winter / when the frost is on the trees. // When ice lights up the night / and snowflakes drift upon the breeze.” Stansbie’s gentle rhymes continue in this pattern through spring, summer, and autumn before summing the year up: “In wind and rain and sun, / from dawn to dusk and all year through… // You are my darling precious one. / Forever I’ll love you!” A different duo is shown on each spread, and the animals are familiar favorites: bear, fox, deer, rabbit, bird, otter, horse, lion, wolf, red squirrel, whale, and polar bear. Simple though gorgeously dappled backgrounds capture the basics of the animals’ various habitats. Mason’s use of light is masterful; many of the illustrations capture the animals at golden hour, and this contributes to the cozy mood evoked by the text. Though the animals’ expressions tend toward anthropomorphism, most of their actions are natural.

A cozy year-round delight. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: March 26, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-984851-49-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Nov. 7, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2018

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A deterministic message detracts from the math.

TEN MAGIC BUTTERFLIES

For 10 flower friends, the grass is always greener…in the sky.

Ten Fantasia-like flowers with adorable faces and leaf arms/hands love being together and basking in the sun, but they also can’t help wanting to break free of their roots and fly when they see the fairies flitting about in the moonlight. One night, “Said the tiny blue one, / ‘Fairy up in the sky, / you see, I’m a flower, / but I want to fly.’ ” While the fairy is puzzled at the flower’s discontent, she grants its wish and transforms it into a butterfly. One by one the others join their mate in the sky as butterflies, each one’s color reflecting its flower origin. At daybreak, though, the new butterflies regret the transformation, and the understanding fairy changes them back again: “But big and tall, / or short and small, / being ourselves / is best of all!” Really? There isn’t even one flower that would really rather fly all the time? Throughout, McKellar emphasizes that there are always 10 in all, though some may be flowers and some butterflies at any given point. The endpapers reinforce ways to make 10 by showing 11 combinations, all in two rows of five, which may confuse children, rather than always keeping butterflies separate from flowers and allowing one row to be longer than the other. The bright colors, butterflies, flowers, and the fairy, who is a dark-skinned pixie with long black hair, seem calibrated to attract girly audiences.

A deterministic message detracts from the math. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Feb. 13, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-101-93382-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: Dec. 6, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2018

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