WHEN THE WORLD WAS WAITING FOR YOU

Shields and Currey introduced a charming rabbit family with three children in When the World Is Ready for Bed (2009). In this successful sequel, a new baby joins the family. With just a few rhyming lines of text, this story of this baby bunny’s arrival into a loving family makes a memorable addition to the welcoming-the-new-baby subgenre. As the family awaits the birth, they prepare the nursery with a cozy crib and new toys. Then the mother is shown with the new arrival and the family gathered around her. The relatives arrive, the baby is celebrated and the gentle ending reminds readers that though the family’s wait for this “dearest baby of them all” is over, the world is still waiting for this new addition “to grow, and bloom, and be, and do.” So much is packed into these few rhyming lines: all the hopes and dreams and love of the welcoming family and the potential for each new life to change the world. The large-format watercolor illustrations of the rabbits are done in a loose style with delightful details in the rabbits’ home and costumes. The warm, golden backgrounds suggest a calm and contented world with a sunny future ahead. Expectant parents will love this as a gift, little ones will warm to the reassuring story of each baby’s importance and bunny-rabbit aficionados will take this charming tale to heart. (Picture book. 2-5, adults)

Pub Date: March 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-59990-531-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Review Posted Online: Feb. 21, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2011

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Perfect for Valentine’s Day, but the syrupy sweetness will cloy after the holiday.

THE ABCS OF LOVE

Animal parents declare their love for their offspring in alphabetical order.

Each page displays an enormous capital letter, one line of verse with the keyword capitalized, and a loving nonhuman parent gazing adoringly at their baby. “A is for Always. I always love you more. / B is for Butterfly kisses. It’s you that I adore.” While not named or labelled as such, the A is also for an alligator and its hatchling and B is for a butterfly and a butterfly child (not a caterpillar—biology is not the aim of this title) interacting in some way with the said letter. For E there are an elephant and a calf; U features a unicorn and foal; and X, keyed to the last letter of the animal’s name, corresponds to a fox and three pups. The final double-page spread shows all the featured creatures and their babies as the last line declares: “Baby, I love you from A to Z!” The verse is standard fare and appropriately sentimental. The art is cartoony-cute and populated by suitably loving critters on solid backgrounds. Hearts accent each scene, but the theme of the project is never in any doubt.

Perfect for Valentine’s Day, but the syrupy sweetness will cloy after the holiday. (Board book. 1-3)

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-7282-2095-6

Page Count: 28

Publisher: Sourcebooks Wonderland

Review Posted Online: Jan. 27, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2021

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New parents of daughters will eat these up and perhaps pass on the lessons learned.

WHY A DAUGHTER NEEDS A MOM

All the reasons why a daughter needs a mother.

Each spread features an adorable cartoon animal parent-child pair on the recto opposite a rhyming verse: “I’ll always support you in giving your all / in every endeavor, the big and the small, / and be there to catch you in case you should fall. / I hope you believe this is true.” A virtually identical book, Why a Daughter Needs a Dad, publishes simultaneously. Both address standing up for yourself and your values, laughing to ease troubles, being thankful, valuing friendship, persevering and dreaming big, being truthful, thinking through decisions, and being open to differences, among other topics. Though the sentiments/life lessons here and in the companion title are heartfelt and important, there are much better ways to deliver them. These books are likely to go right over children’s heads and developmental levels (especially with the rather advanced vocabulary); their parents are the more likely audience, and for them, the books provide some coaching in what kids need to hear. The two books are largely interchangeable, especially since there are so few references to mom or dad, but one spread in each book reverts to stereotype: Dad balances the two-wheeler, and mom helps with clothing and hair styles. Since the books are separate, it aids in customization for many families.

New parents of daughters will eat these up and perhaps pass on the lessons learned. (Picture book. 4-8, adult)

Pub Date: May 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-4926-6781-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Sourcebooks Jabberwocky

Review Posted Online: March 17, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2019

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