A dramatic story layered with relationship dynamics and flares of humor.

SMOKE

A teen in a small Michigan town hatches a secret plot to grow and sell marijuana in order to pay off her family’s debts.

Straight-laced, earnest Honor Augustine lives with her beloved dad, who struggles with PTSD following his military service in Iraq, and her goofy but supportive brother, Knox. She loves the greenhouse business that her grandparents owned and that is now managed by her aunt—so when she discovers that they are in danger of losing it due to financial losses, she desperately searches for a way to help. This results in her somewhat implausible decision to start a weed-growing operation, clandestinely situated in the greenhouse basement. In a character-driven, first-person narrative that is at turns anguished and funny, Honor stumbles through the consequences of this scenario, with various subplots that include a romance with a guy she’s not sure she can trust; interpersonal conflict with her best friend, Zareen Kapoor, a D.C. transplant; the stress of a shadowy figure who seems to be stalking them; and the challenge of her dad’s untreated mental health condition. With all of these threads woven throughout, the novel can feel a little unfocused at times, but this is largely an original, engaging novel that fans of contemporary teen fiction will enjoy. All of the main characters are White; Zareen’s name cues her as South Asian.

A dramatic story layered with relationship dynamics and flares of humor. (Fiction. 14-18)

Pub Date: June 15, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-593-30590-4

Page Count: 384

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: April 14, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2021

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This grittily provocative debut explores the horrors of self-harm and the healing power of artistic expression.

GIRL IN PIECES

After surviving a suicide attempt, a fragile teen isn't sure she can endure without cutting herself.

Seventeen-year-old Charlie Davis, a white girl living on the margins, thinks she has little reason to live: her father drowned himself; her bereft and abusive mother kicked her out; her best friend, Ellis, is nearly brain dead after cutting too deeply; and she's gone through unspeakable experiences living on the street. After spending time in treatment with other young women like her—who cut, burn, poke, and otherwise hurt themselves—Charlie is released and takes a bus from the Twin Cities to Tucson to be closer to Mikey, a boy she "like-likes" but who had pined for Ellis instead. But things don't go as planned in the Arizona desert, because sweet Mikey just wants to be friends. Feeling rejected, Charlie, an artist, is drawn into a destructive new relationship with her sexy older co-worker, a "semifamous" local musician who's obviously a junkie alcoholic. Through intense, diarylike chapters chronicling Charlie's journey, the author captures the brutal and heartbreaking way "girls who write their pain on their bodies" scar and mar themselves, either succumbing or surviving. Like most issue books, this is not an easy read, but it's poignant and transcendent as Charlie breaks more and more before piecing herself back together.

This grittily provocative debut explores the horrors of self-harm and the healing power of artistic expression. (author’s note) (Fiction. 14 & up)

Pub Date: Aug. 30, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-101-93471-5

Page Count: 416

Publisher: Delacorte

Review Posted Online: May 4, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2016

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This story is necessary. This story is important.

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THE HATE U GIVE

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter is a black girl and an expert at navigating the two worlds she exists in: one at Garden Heights, her black neighborhood, and the other at Williamson Prep, her suburban, mostly white high school.

Walking the line between the two becomes immensely harder when Starr is present at the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend, Khalil, by a white police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Khalil’s death becomes national news, where he’s called a thug and possible drug dealer and gangbanger. His death becomes justified in the eyes of many, including one of Starr’s best friends at school. The police’s lackadaisical attitude sparks anger and then protests in the community, turning it into a war zone. Questions remain about what happened in the moments leading to Khalil’s death, and the only witness is Starr, who must now decide what to say or do, if anything. Thomas cuts to the heart of the matter for Starr and for so many like her, laying bare the systemic racism that undergirds her world, and she does so honestly and inescapably, balancing heartbreak and humor. With smooth but powerful prose delivered in Starr’s natural, emphatic voice, finely nuanced characters, and intricate and realistic relationship dynamics, this novel will have readers rooting for Starr and opening their hearts to her friends and family.

This story is necessary. This story is important. (Fiction. 14-adult)

Pub Date: Feb. 28, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-06-249853-3

Page Count: 464

Publisher: Balzer + Bray/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Dec. 6, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2016

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