A faithful, if uneven, retelling.

OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE

Bernier-Grand offers her version of the origins of the popular Mexican shrine.

Abandoning her typical free-verse style for a more traditional narrative, the author describes the Aztec Juan Diego’s three encounters with the Virgin Mary on Tepeyac Hill, near Tlatelolco (now Mexico City). Mary requests that Juan Diego tell the local bishop to build her a shrine on the hill. As an Indian, Juan Diego has a difficult time getting an audience with the skeptical man, much less convincing him that the Virgin Mary would reveal herself to such a lowly person. On his third visit to the bishop, Juan Diego carries a sign from the Virgin to the bishop: roses in December. When Juan Diego reveals the roses, the bishop finds that “the image of the Blessed Virgin Mary was painted on Juan Diego’s tilma!” The author concludes the tale with details on the significance of the shrine, the origins of the name “Our Lady of Guadalupe” and other relevant historical facts and dates. While Engel’s stately oil and encaustic illustrations match the seriousness of the book’s subject, readers may be distracted by the type choice and text placement, as well as a few awkward page turns. Those familiar with the author’s verse works may long for her return to that form.

A faithful, if uneven, retelling. (author’s note) (Picture book/religion. 7-12)

Pub Date: April 1, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-7614-6135-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Marshall Cavendish

Review Posted Online: Feb. 29, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2012

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Warmhearted cross-cultural friendship for a refugee on distant shores: both necessary and kind.

LETTERS FROM CUBA

In 1938, a Jewish refugee from Poland joins her father in small-town Cuba.

After three years abroad, Papa’s saved only enough money to send for one of his children. Thus Esther boards the steamship alone even though she’s not quite 12. Cuba is a constant surprise: Her father’s an itinerant peddler and not a shopkeeper; they live as the only Jews in a tiny village; and she’s allowed to wear sandals and go bare-legged in the heat. But the island is also a constant joy. Nearly everyone Esther meets is generous beyond their means. She adores her new trade as a dressmaker, selling her creations in Havana to earn money to bring over the rest of the family. In glowing letters to her sister back in Poland, Esther details how she’s learning Spanish through the poems of José Martí. She introduces her sister to her beloved new friends: a White doctor’s wife and her vegetarian, atheist husband; a Black, Santería-following granddaughter of an ex-slave; a Chinese Cuban shopkeeper’s nephew. Esther’s first year in Cuba is marked by the calendar of Jewish holidays, as she wonders if she can be both Cuban and a Jew. As the coming war looms in Europe, she and her friends find solidarity, standing together against local Nazis and strike breakers. An author’s note describes how the story was loosely inspired by the author’s own family history.

Warmhearted cross-cultural friendship for a refugee on distant shores: both necessary and kind. (bibliography) (Historical fiction. 8-11)

Pub Date: Aug. 25, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-525-51647-7

Page Count: 272

Publisher: Nancy Paulsen Books

Review Posted Online: June 3, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2020

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A powerful blend of important themes and everyday triumphs and sorrows.

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HOW TO FIND WHAT YOU'RE NOT LOOKING FOR

It’s 1967, and Ariel Goldberg’s adored older sister, Leah, has fallen for Raj, an immigrant college student from Bombay.

Their parents disapprove: To them, it’s bad enough that Leah wants to marry someone of a different race, even worse that he isn’t Jewish. After Leah elopes without even a letter to her sister, 11-year-old Ari is forced to reckon with a new understanding of her place within her family as the daughter who is now expected to take on the good-girl role. But that’s not her only problem. Her parents dreamed of a better life, yet they can’t afford to keep their beloved bakery running. Her mother sees Ari’s struggle with dysgraphia as laziness, and as the only Jewish kid in sixth grade, she faces antisemitism that goes unrecognized by her teachers. Her strained relationship with her parents and their beliefs rings heartbreakingly true alongside her struggle to find her own voice through poetry. As she and her best friend set out in secret to find Leah and repair her broken family, Ari must decide what she believes is right in an increasingly tumultuous world. Hiranandani captures with great nuance the details of Ari’s life. Sacrifices in the service of assimilation, the lies we tell the people we love most, and how we go about forgiving them are given specificity in Ari’s matter-of-fact and observant second-person present point of view.

A powerful blend of important themes and everyday triumphs and sorrows. (author's note) (Fiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: Sept. 14, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-525-55503-2

Page Count: 384

Publisher: Kokila

Review Posted Online: July 8, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2021

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