Meticulous research and lively anecdotes combine to provide a powerful volume of social history.

OVERGROUND RAILROAD (THE YOUNG ADULT ADAPTATION)

THE GREEN BOOK AND THE ROOTS OF BLACK TRAVEL IN AMERICA

The history of a travel guide for African Americans that reflected far more than just issues of mobility for its users.

From 1936 to 1966, the Green Book was a successful guide supporting Black people traveling during a time of segregation. Its creator, letter carrier Victor Green, creatively developed his publication into a wide-ranging product that stood out from similar guides of the era. As the automobile became ubiquitous, African Americans sought guidance about establishments that would accept their business and where they could be safe. Discriminatory practices were common around the U.S., so Green expanded his coverage to include most of the country. The Green Book also served as a way to promote Black businesses. Following World War II, it highlighted historically Black colleges where returning veterans, denied admission to predominantly White institutions, could use the GI Bill for education. From 1949 to 1957, Green’s Reservation Bureau initiative supported customers with navigating international travel. Taylor has skillfully adapted her acclaimed 2020 adult title for teens into a smooth, readable volume that provides context for the rise of Black travel guides and the societal changes that Green and his wife, Alma, responded to. Her insights into the significance of the Green Book for women are fascinating, as is the compelling look at the costs and benefits of integration for Black Americans. Numerous images greatly enhance the text.

Meticulous research and lively anecdotes combine to provide a powerful volume of social history. (notes, bibliography, image credits, index) (Nonfiction. 12-16)

Pub Date: Jan. 4, 2022

ISBN: 978-1-4197-4949-0

Page Count: 272

Publisher: Amulet/Abrams

Review Posted Online: Oct. 13, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2021

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An engaging, admiring, and insightful portrait of an uncompromising, civic-minded, visionary artist.

MAYA LIN

THINKING WITH HER HANDS

One of the world’s most celebrated creators of civic architecture is profiled in this accessible, engaging biography.

Similar in style and format to her Everybody Paints!: The Lives and Art of the Wyeth Family (2014) and Wideness and Wonder: The Life and Art of Georgia O’Keeffe (2011), Rubin’s well-researched profile examines the career, creative processes, and career milestones of Maya Lin. Rubin discusses at length Lin’s most famous achievement, designing the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Chinese-American Lin was a reserved college student who entered and won the competition to design and build the memorial. Her youth and ethnicity were subjects of great controversy, and Rubin discusses how Lin fought to ensure her vision of the memorial remained intact. Other notable works by Lin, including the Civil Rights Memorial for the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Alabama, a library and chapel for the Children’s Defense Fund, the Museum of Chinese in America, and the outdoor Wave Field project are examined but not in as much depth as the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Attractively designed, the book is illustrated extensively with color photos and drawings.

An engaging, admiring, and insightful portrait of an uncompromising, civic-minded, visionary artist. (bibliography, source notes, index) (Biography. 12-15)

Pub Date: Nov. 7, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4521-0837-7

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Chronicle Books

Review Posted Online: Aug. 21, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2017

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Though there are plenty of issues worthy of attention not addressed here, this lively effort serves well as a revealing,...

EYES & SPIES

HOW YOU'RE TRACKED AND WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW

From the Visual Exploration series

The word “Orwellian” is oddly absent in this chilling look at how we now live in a world of near-constant surveillance and data collection.

Kyi examines how information and data about almost everyone are collected and used by individuals, government agencies, companies, and other organizations. She poses three questions to readers: who’s watching, and why? Where is the line between public and private? How can you keep your secrets to yourself? These questions are addressed in chapters exploring such subjects as computer surveillance, cyberbullying, data mining, and personal privacy. There is discussion of such surveillance technologies as drones, GPS, and RFID tags. Although there is little here that does not seem creepy, “Creepy Line” sidebars in each chapter highlight controversial real-life scenarios and ask readers where they would set their own boundaries. That label refers to a statement from former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, who said the company’s policy was “to get right up to the creepy line and not cross it.” There are also ongoing arguments posed for both increased security and increased privacy, encouraging readers to think critically about the issues.

Though there are plenty of issues worthy of attention not addressed here, this lively effort serves well as a revealing, thoughtful, and provocative introduction to a complex subject and alarming realities. (further reading, source notes, index) (Nonfiction. 12-16)

Pub Date: March 14, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-55451-911-8

Page Count: 140

Publisher: Annick Press

Review Posted Online: Dec. 26, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2017

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