An enjoyable tale of the marvels of adventuring and the comfort of home.

THE BOLD, BRAVE BUNNY

An abundance of bunnies in the burrow propels one of their number to explore the world beyond.

Everywhere Teetu the bunny looks, there are bunnies. “When he turned left…bunnies. When he turned right…bunnies.” They’re even in his books: “A IS FOR ANTEATER. B IS FOR BUNNY.” When Teetu complains, his mother counsels tolerance, but rambunctious siblings and cousins in one very small space are certainly cause for a burrow breakout. Under “sunlight…starlight…moonlight, [and] flashlight,” Teetu braves a journey filled with new sights that fuel his imagination. Writing and sketching, Teetu creates a book of his own inspired by the curious forest creatures he encounters and the inky, twisty trees that surround them. “B is not only for…bunnies.” The need for a break satiated, Teetu heads back home with some unexpected help and an appreciation for his cozy, albeit bustling, abode and all the many meanings of B. Debut illustrator Lam’s illustrations emulate print techniques and stick to a palette primarily made up of slates, black, and white. His bendy trees that curl into the shapes of animals are visual stimuli for Teetu and readers alike. Elliptical and circular elements recur throughout and occasionally frame Ferry’s text. Accents of red solely adorn the band of bunnies and their belongings.

An enjoyable tale of the marvels of adventuring and the comfort of home. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Feb. 11, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-06-285031-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Oct. 13, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2019

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

As ephemeral as a valentine.

LOVE FROM THE CRAYONS

Daywalt and Jeffers’ wandering crayons explore love.

Each double-page spread offers readers a vision of one of the anthropomorphic crayons on the left along with the statement “Love is [color].” The word love is represented by a small heart in the appropriate color. Opposite, childlike crayon drawings explain how that color represents love. So, readers learn, “love is green. / Because love is helpful.” The accompanying crayon drawing depicts two alligators, one holding a recycling bin and the other tossing a plastic cup into it, offering readers two ways of understanding green. Some statements are thought-provoking: “Love is white. / Because sometimes love is hard to see,” reaches beyond the immediate image of a cat’s yellow eyes, pink nose, and black mouth and whiskers, its white face and body indistinguishable from the paper it’s drawn on, to prompt real questions. “Love is brown. / Because sometimes love stinks,” on the other hand, depicted by a brown bear standing next to a brown, squiggly turd, may provoke giggles but is fundamentally a cheap laugh. Some of the color assignments have a distinctly arbitrary feel: Why is purple associated with the imagination and pink with silliness? Fans of The Day the Crayons Quit (2013) hoping for more clever, metaliterary fun will be disappointed by this rather syrupy read.

As ephemeral as a valentine. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Dec. 24, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5247-9268-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Penguin Workshop

Review Posted Online: Feb. 2, 2021

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

There’s nothing especially new here, but the good-natured celebration of books, reading, and libraries will charm fellow...

THE BOOK HOG

A porcine hoarder of books learns to read—and to share.

The Book Hog’s obsession is clear from the start. Short declarative sentences describe his enthusiasm (“The Book Hog loved books”), catalog the things he likes about the printed page, and eventually reveal his embarrassing secret (“He didn’t know how to read”). While the text is straightforward, plenty of amusing visual details will entertain young listeners. A picture of the Book Hog thumbing through a book while seated on the toilet should induce some giggles. The allusive name of a local bookshop (“Wilbur’s”) as well as the covers of a variety of familiar and much-loved books (including some of the author’s own) offer plenty to pore over. And the fact that the titles become legible only after our hero learns to read is a particularly nice touch. A combination of vignettes, single-page illustrations and double-page spreads that feature Pizzoli’s characteristic style—heavy black outlines, a limited palette of mostly salmon and mint green, and simple shapes—move the plot along briskly. Librarians will appreciate the positive portrayal of Miss Olive, an elephant who welcomes the Book Hog warmly to storytime, though it’s unlikely most will be able to match her superlative level of service.

There’s nothing especially new here, but the good-natured celebration of books, reading, and libraries will charm fellow bibliophiles, and the author’s fans will enjoy making another anthropomorphic animal friend. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: March 26, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-368-03689-4

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Review Posted Online: Nov. 12, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more