BISCUIT GOES TO SCHOOL

Biscuit, Capucilli’s playful pooch (Biscuit Wants to Play, 2001, etc.), tries a paw at higher learning. After being admonished by his owner that dogs do not go to school, the curious canine decides to attend for a day. A quick dash across the park deposits the inquisitive pooch inside the school, where Biscuit takes a quick peek at a typical school day. Story time and snack time are the highlights of the puppy’s trip, while the gentle suspense of being discovered by the little girl heightens the tension of the tale just enough to sweep hesitant readers along to the conclusion. For this My First I Can Read Book, Capucilli’s selection of topic and complexity of vocabulary is right on target for novice readers. Her hallmark combination of questions and statements, liberally interspersed with Biscuit’s jovial barks, executed in the most basic language—is at once familiar and encouraging for the youngest reader. Schories’s colorful illustrations portray the puppy’s exuberant explorations and frequent tumbles into mischief. A warmly and invitingly drawn school environment, populated by friendly students and genial teachers, will resonate with children already in school while allowing little one’s a glimpse of what to expect. (Easy reader. 3-5)

Pub Date: July 1, 2002

ISBN: 0-06-028682-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2002

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SAY HELLO!

Today Carmelita visits her Abuela Rosa, but to get there she must walk. Down Ninth Avenue she strolls with her mother and dog. Colorful shops and congenial neighbors greet them along the way, and at each stop Carmelita says hello—in Spanish, Arabic, Hebrew and more. With a friendly “Jambo” for Joseph, a “Bonjour” at the bakery and an affectionate “Hey” for Max and Angel, the pig-tailed girl happily exercises her burgeoning multilingual skills. Her world is a vibrant community, where neighborliness, camaraderie and culture are celebrated. Isadora’s collaged artwork, reminiscent of Ezra Jack Keats, contains lovely edges and imperfections, which abet the feeling of an urban environment. Skillfully, she draws with her scissors, the cut-paper elements acting as her line work. Everything has a texture and surface, and with almost no solid colors, the city street is realized as a real, organic place. Readers will fall for the sociable Carmelita as they proudly learn a range of salutations, and the artist’s rich environment, packed with hidden details and charming animals, will delight readers with each return visit. Simply enchanting. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: April 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-399-25230-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: Dec. 23, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2010

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TEN LITTLE FINGERS AND TEN LITTLE TOES

A pleasing poem that celebrates babies around the world. Whether from a remote village or an urban dwelling, a tent or the snow, Fox notes that each “of these babies, / as everyone knows, / had ten little fingers / and ten little toes.” Repeated in each stanza, the verse establishes an easy rhythm. Oxenbury’s charming illustrations depict infants from a variety of ethnicities wearing clothing that invokes a sense of place. Her pencil drawings, with clean watercolor washes laid in, are sweetly similar to those in her early board books (Clap Hands, 1987, etc.). Each stanza introduces a new pair of babies, and the illustrations cleverly incorporate the children from the previous stanzas onto one page, allowing readers to count not only fingers and toes but also babies. The last stanza switches its focus from two children to one “sweet little child,” and reveals the narrator as that baby’s mother. Little readers will take to the repetition and counting, while parents will be moved by the last spread: a sweet depiction of mother and baby. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-15-206057-2

Page Count: 34

Publisher: Harcourt

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2008

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